Aug. 3, 2020

Getting to Know Mighty Networks

Getting to Know Mighty Networks

Behind the scenes of this powerful community tool

After hearing more and more community managers talk about Mighty Networks, I wanted to get more information. I reached out to Mighty Networks, and got in touch with the product manager Jessica Shambora.

We talk about the following topics:

Mighty Networks vs Facebook Group

Best practices for building a network.

How your community can grow using mobile apps.

Examples of thriving networks.

The different types of networks.

We talk about the different plan levels and what each level provides.

We also tackle the process of pricing your network.

Mentioned in This Episode

Mighty Networks

Start Ugly Book

School of Podcasting

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Transcript

The following transcript was created via AI using Otter.ai

David Jackson  

If you go to mightynetworks.com it kind of explains you kind of do a lot of stuff. I mean, you can use it to have a community you can sell online courses. So kind of,  you're talking to podcasters. What a podcast or maybe you want to do with mighty networks.

 

Jessica Shambora  

Yeah. So you point out something great, which is that we have a very flexible platform. So it can be as lots of different ways. We actually started as a community platform and then realized that basically a lot of our customers came to us said we really want to do courses on your platform too. And so we realized how those two things should go hand in hand. And so we built out our course piece. And we already had the ability to also offer subgroups. So that's another piece of it. So to just back up,  a mighty network is your space online. It is your own little world that you get to build. In fact, we have the ability to you can use a custom domain, so it's your destination. And it's your people. So they create profiles just for your mighty network. It's not a centralized social media platform like you would find who at Facebook or LinkedIn. So your members are your members. They come they create a profile within your mighty network community. And then within that mighty network community, you can offer groups and courses and you can charge for any of those things you can charge for your mighty network. You can charge for your groups, you can charge for your courses, you can run your groups like a mastermind. If you want to do that. You can also run your courses however you want, you can run them live Where you're doing live sessions with folks and sending out materials, uploading materials, or you can run them sort of evergreen. But the great part is, is that the community aspect of the course is lives right alongside the course material itself. So there's no I go here for my course and somewhere else for the community. It's all in one place. And we've been actually teaching our own course on the platform for close to a year now, we just started our ninth cohort. And we have just seen how beautiful this model works. And that when people experience it, there's no going back. It's like, why would you want to learn any other way, then inside of a community with other people who are going through this with you, it's just no fun to learn in a vacuum. And it's also you lose all of that motivation and accountability and momentum that you get from being with other people who are on this journey with you and you're all doing it together. So we really see courses as a core use case for the platform. But at the same time, we also see communities that are completely Driven by just the interactions of its members and what they have going on week to week, and sometimes they don't even use the courses. So so really offers that flexibility.

 

David Jackson  

Yeah, I had somebody on my chat today that stopped by. And she brought it's it's funny, every time I turn around, somebody is bringing up mighty networks. And I forget, she had a very interesting disease that I can never pronounce if I tried. But she said, Yeah, I'm creating a space for my people. They want to go to someplace where I don't have to explain what it's like to have something I couldn't pronounce. And she said, Oh, yeah, I'm starting this. And she said the same thing. I'm going to start with a community, but then they're going to have some areas that you can charge for. So you could basically use this as what people call a freemium, you can have free spaces to get them in, and then charge them for the courses.

 

Jessica Shambora  

That's absolutely right. So that's kind of one of the two models we see. So make your mighty network free or public to enter and then offer paid experiences within that community that you can then sort of upsell people to, or you can make the whole mighty network pay it and make it a paid membership. And then you could also offer sort of one time experiences within that. So maybe the overall community is subscription-based. And then you offer one-off courses inside that are,  a one time purchase? So basically, those are the two most common models that we do see, what are some of the,

 

David Jackson  

I guess mistakes or things that maybe people have the wrong expectations when they start out? When you see somebody like, oh, boy, they're kind of going off the grid here. What's, what are some best practices?

 

Jessica Shambora  

Yeah, and I should mention the name of our courses called the community design masterclass, and we've had upwards of 1600 people go through it now. So that's really exciting. I think the first thing that we hear from people that we see with people, when they're creating a community is they think it's just a place to basically repost their content from other channels. So like, I had someone even asked me today like, well, what should my content strategy be,  compared to Instagram, and I'm like, well, this is not Instagram.  Instagram is you pushing posts and content at people Mighty network is about bringing those people together to do something together. It's about the connections are making and the fact that it gets better with each person who joins that community. And there are interactions happening between your members, not just you and your members. So that's the first thing is that it's not about content. It's not about pushing content at people. Because we are in a world now where it used to be it was hard to find information. Now, there's just too much of it. And so what are the job of a host, which is what we call our creators on our platform, is sometimes to actually like clear out the noise for people and help just bring them kind of what they need to know. And then help them make sense of it and connect the dots and where they're really making those connections is actually interacting with each other, both in what they bring to each other and their stories and experiences, but also in terms of the support that they offer each other the encouragement and the motivation to keep moving. So I think where we see that is that number one problem of how people are framing up what a community And what you do with it. It's not like a content repository, you can have content there, you can offer content to people. But there has to be something more than that. I think the second thing that we see a lot is that people think they have to have it right from the beginning, they have to be perfect. In order to launch this thing they have to everything needs to be perfect from day one the day they open the doors. And what we're finding is that the most successful money networks hosts are those that are just like, have a growth mindset, have an experiment, experimenters mindset, they're like, I'm going to try this thing and see how it works. And if it clicks, is my community great? If not, I'm going to try something else. And they're consistent in their practices where they do something,  week over week for six weeks, and then see if it takes and if it doesn't, they try something else. So they're not discouraged. And they also kind of take away that sense of like, being a perfectionist, like everything has to be perfect. Instead, they're just about like, am I creating results for people. Basically, they keep their eyes on the prize as opposed to just feeling like this is again, some money Picture perfect place of like Instagram world. It's not about that.

 

David Jackson  

You can start ugly as my friend, Chris Krimitsos has a book called Start Ugly.

 

Jessica Shambora  

I know. That's like, That's amazing, you know. And problem is that people get in their own way, when they get too attached to perfection right or to attach to, it's got to look like this or I've got to have it's got to be huge. That's another challenge that we see people get so attached to the numbers. What's your biggest mighty network?  how many what do how many people do I need to make it engaging? Some of our best mighty networks have less than 40 people. But what's happening is the engagement, the connections that people are making there are real, they're substantial. They're making a difference in people's lives. And that's what really matters. So that's what we're focused on and what we encourage our hosts to be focused on.

 

David Jackson  

Well, and it may be a case where granted, if you're having people pay for these, you want a really big group, but on the other hand, I would think in some cases, having a gigantic group. Now I've got to start, can you, I'm assuming You can assign people to be moderators and things like that. Because I know I don't run into that a lot. But I could hear, I could see where somebody comes in, they just want to,  whatever. Hey, look, I have a new episode, you're like, oh, let's not start that, because it just turns into a giant spam Fest, right? Yeah, the whole nine yards, which

 

Jessica Shambora  

we don't actually see happen that much in mighty networks, which is awesome is that we are encouraged community guidelines, people tend to respect that the culture in mid network is very different. Because again, it's set apart from any other space online. And it's it feels like its own world. And so because of that, it has its own rules. And people follow those rules, right? 

 

David Jackson  

well, and that's the thing I went through and started to play with one and you guys make it so easy. It's like, Hey, here's the first thing you got to do. You can tweak this if you want, and then it just kind of walks you through that. But you mentioned it is away from, in some cases, everything else. So what would you say to that person? That's like, Hmm, I don't know if I want to take my community into a brand new place where they're not there yet. I have to say, Oh, hey, I know. This is a cool room. It is. And I have my definite reservations about Facebook, especially now with all the privacy stuff. But,  you're like, Hey, I know it's cool over here. And you're all comfy. I've got I've got drinks and cookies and the other room over here too. I mean, are you having people that kind of have that kind of like, I'm not sure if that's the right move or not? What do you say to that?

 

Jessica Shambora  

We'll do that concern. First of all, I want to go back to what you said earlier about making it easy to get started, I think you're referring to a mighty checklist, which is awesome, are awesome. They give you tons of templates and videos and guides to getting started. You just basically have to run through that and you're ready to go. So I'm glad you found that and found it. I'm going to

 

David Jackson  

say it took maybe 20 minutes if that and that's just it wouldn't even been that long. But do you set up is it categories

 

Jessica Shambora  

when you set up your topics and then you also set up member can a member categories which are like helping people identify,  how they want to get or how you want to organize your people inside of your network?

 

David Jackson  

Yeah, so I had to figure out what it was I was doing there and otherwise once I did that, it was just going right along. So yeah, it is super easy to set up.

 

Jessica Shambora  

Yeah. So that's our, that's our goals make it easy. And at the same time flexible, right, give people options. So yeah, anyways, just want to call that out. So back to your question about Facebook. So it's an interesting one that comes up and  the thing that I would say is kind of to your analogy is, if you're a Facebook group, do you want to be just another room inside a huge, like hotel of rooms where people are just walking down the halls and dipping their head into this room looks interesting. Maybe I'll check it out. I'm not much going on here. I'm gonna go into the next room. To me, that's Facebook, right? It's like, yeah, it's a big hotel, everybody's in it. Maybe they can stop off and check out the rooms, but they're not really invested or engaged in any of them, because they're always kind of like, well, what's going on in this next room or so and so said, there's something else going on over here,  I just got a notification that I should go check out this other thing that's happening. So it's super distracting. You're always being pulled away. Not only that, but you're also being asked advertise your members, when you have a Facebook group are being shown groups like yours to go join. So you know that you're actively being pulled away from what they're doing in your group. And the reality is that if people are coming to your space, they're probably doing it just because they happen to be on Facebook. They didn't do it deliberately to come spend time in your group, right? They're like, Oh, I'm on Facebook. I'll stop by and see what's happening in this Facebook group. But I don't know, I got like 20 other notifications to check. So I'm not really sure. Like how much time I'm actually going to spend in here, right? Is this the most engaging material on the platform? I don't know. Now, if you can trust that to money network, someone is choosing to consciously go to that place and spend time there and when they're there, they're focused, and they're not getting distracted and pulled away into other things and other places, which,  from everything I'm hearing from people I talked to, and I don't know if you're hearing this too, is people want more of those kinds of experiences now. They want they don't like that. This attention-grabbing thing where it's like, I feel like I'm bouncing between one thing to another. And I don't really at the end of it all, I'm like, What did I just spend the last 20 minutes doing. Whereas if you're inside of a mighty network, you're there and you feel like you've actually done something you've spent time with people you care about, you probably were learning something you were probably in,  engaged in something meaningful. And so that's how we really see it as a really a different difference in terms of the type of experience that people are having, and that, how important is your group, if in order to get people to come to it, they have to be a Facebook member, how important is it to them, versus they're actually actively choosing to come and spend time in your world that you've created, and really do something there. And the reality is, is if you're offering something of value to them, that's helping them change their life in a meaningful way or supporting them, then they're going to make the time to go there. And they're going to make it a habit and make it a part of their lives. So

 

David Jackson  

and You said my favorite word, which is value. And when you deliver value, and that person then sticks around, they're also then going to tell their friends Oh, you got to come over here. And then just breed success. I did mention notification. So let's say,  I download the app that comes,  I've got my custom map, and everything's cool. And I can log in there. And I guess I would get some sort of little number one or red.or, something letting me know that there's activity there. Can what if I'm owed, can I get an email notification, okay. And in fact, so that was just

 

Jessica Shambora  

offered the ability, you can get it via email, mobile, or both. And we also just launched a digest so that if you just want to get all your notifications in one day, at the end of the day, you can get that so we make that possible, too. Mm.

 

David Jackson  

Yeah. Cuz that's gonna be the way if you're worried about your audience not coming to you, you can still go to them via notification saying, Look what your look at the party we're having here.

 

Jessica Shambora  

Exactly. And I Want to note that that is something that's really unique about our platform versus some of the other course platforms out there is that we have native mobile apps for Android, iOS, and the iPad, and very few other platforms have that. And that's what allows us to engage people at the same level that they would be on a Facebook or another social platform. Because again, we have those apps that live on your phone, and send you notifications and keep people coming back in and we see a huge amount of engagement happening on mobile. So upwards of 65% are happening on our mobile apps. So I would just like ask people, if you're on a platform right now, where you're the platform doesn't have mobile apps, like how much engagement Are you missing out on?

 

David Jackson  

Can you give us some examples because it is kind of like,  almost like a Swiss Army knife. There's so many different ways you can configure it that you've seen people. If they're podcasters, that's that would be great. Or just then people are using it to build their community and  advance their, whatever their goal is, I guess

 

Jessica Shambora  

I would love to it's my favorite thing to do to talk about hosts and what they're building. And one of my favorite parts of my job is that I actually get to interview them. So let's talk about a few of those. And as you, as you mentioned, many of them do start as podcasters. So I'll mention a few of those as well as we go through. But we basically see three categories, the most, most common categories of hosts that come and build a mighty network. The first is professional driven networks or industry groups, basically. So this is everything from youth ministers, to nurses, to florists, to financial advisors, to therapists, to I mean, the list goes on. And it's almost like if you can think of it someone's creating a network for restaurant owners. And the reality is, these are all people who used to belong to sort of,  industry organizations, and that world is all evolving, and they're taking it online and they're doing it in this way. We've got a great one for CIOs called CIO net. So if almost if you can imagine it, we probably have a mighty network for that profession. chaplains and the ones that we do see very commonly are people who work independently. And so they don't, they don't work in an office with other people. They're sort of either independent contractors or,  they work in a profession like therapists or ministers where it's there's some confidentiality and you need to run things by other people, right. But they're also sort of ongoing education and continuing education happening in these spaces. So one of our really successful ones is called the advisor growth community started by two guys who had a podcast actually two podcasts, their financial advisors, and they had and they also had the super active community of folks they were connected to on Twitter. And they just kind of had this idea of like, we should bring these people together in like a smaller, more intimate space where we can really get into some of the things that we want to explore. They're really curious growth mindset folks. And so they did it and the community is there, no courses inside so it is a purely pure community. It's $2,000 a year to join and they've got upwards now of  I believe 100 150 members, and it is just phenomenal that what they're doing. So the advisor growth community is one that I love and they're just doing great work and their members love it. And it's I've talked to some of their members and it's really just changed for them because financial advisors again, often work independently, they need a group of people they can bounce things off of. We also have one for those guys. One of them's based, I think, actually, in the Midwest and the others in San Diego, we have a lot of CO hosts who are based in different places, which is super fun. Another set of co-host to women that I interviewed recently have a mighty network for people who want to be children's books, authors, and illustrators. And so they take this industry that's very opaque and hard to break into. There's no real guidance for how to do this. And they take these people through it not only how to build a portfolio of artwork that you can then pitch to publishers and editors, but also the business behind it. Like how do you build a business off of this, and it's almost like you see these little mini business schools For all these different industries, my other favorite one is a woman in Australia who has been for floral arrangers. So she teaches floral arrangers how to really build a successful floral arranging business. And she teaches them everything from,  tools of the trade of actually working with the flowers and all those pieces, but then how to be profitable and how and all the business skills that come to that because a lot of people that get into working with flowers don't necessarily have the business savvy to go with it. And I would say she also has built her audience off of a podcast that she does. So I would say probably at least 50% of our folks have some type of podcasts that they're doing are starting. We've got so that's that industry channel, that's an industry group. The second category we see is around health and wellness. Lots of that right now and then spirituality kind of include in that as well. So that could be anything like the woman you were talking about earlier who has a rare disease and they want to be with other people who have that so they can talk about, self-care and treatment. And whatever else they're working on. But it's also people who are like exploring new aspects of spirituality or using,  herbs for,  different types of treatments or things like that. So, again, a woman that I spoke to a couple of weeks ago, she has a mighty network called raw spirituality. And she started with a podcast, her podcast, direct followers started writing into her, she's like, these people need to know each other. And then she just her friend happened to have a mighty network and was like, you got to try this. And now rock spirituality is this thriving, mighty network for people who are exploring,  concepts like,  consciousness and enlightenment and all of those pieces. I also have another woman who does like bodywork meditation, same thing, and a lot of these folks too, are who are people who had physical businesses that they had to shut down with COVID and they're actually now able to either bring them online fully online and run courses and things out of their money network. Or there, they kind of pivoted and went deeper into a line of business, they had always kind of wanted to start around breathwork or some of these not super mainstream, but like evolving an emerging space of wellness and health. So that's the second area that we see a lot. And then the third area is around,  just kind of hobbies, right? So special interests, hobbies, things that people really get invested in. We've got knitters and weavers and I left this out of the industry one it's kind of some of them crossover. There are dog trainers, people who you know how to train dogs for competition. Basically, if like, if someone's into it, there's probably a mighty network for it. There's someone just launched a sourdough making mighty network that I saw that looks awesome. And then one of my favorites is called the Black Pearl magic digital salon. And this is to young black women who are cosmetologist and they have curly hair, and they wanted to teach women how to manage their hair. hair. And so this has blown up. I mean, it just huge. They launched a course called the 30-day hair detox. They bring their members in, they teach them how to manage their hair. And then after the course, the women are inside the community as they begin to implement the things that they've learned. And they get feedback directly from the, from the host of this network, teaching them how to adopt this new routine for their hair. Those are just some of the examples that we've seen. But the creativity, the inspiration of these people is just phenomenal blows me away. I love it.

 

David Jackson  

That's interesting. It's very cool. All of those are, again, very, very niche, but yet they have a community of people that are dying to get together and talk to each other. But it's a perfect match for podcasters.

 

Jessica Shambora  

 Right, because there's everything so it's like, if you've got a podcast, you've got a group of people that wants to get together and connect on this thing and go deeper with it. It's perfect.

 

David Jackson  

One thing I definitely want to hit on you mentioned that you do have if you want to you can take a course on how to set up your course. But you don't have To do that you go, you guys do have, just like I mentioned the what is the two, three? And then is there other types of tutorials or things like that if somebody wants to, if somebody goes, I don't really,  I've got enough to join. I don't want to have to take a course to learn how to do it.

 

Jessica Shambora  

We do have a lot of that stuff on our resources page on our website. I would say that we have also a very robust Help Center with lots of videos and tutorials kind of walking you through how to do things.  it's so interesting, who comes and takes the masterclass the community design masterclass because we get people who are brand new to mighty networks. And then we have people who have been on the platform for two years, and they're like, I'm gonna go check this thing out. And it's probably because it's just so fun to be a part of this group of people. It's like, it's not like your normal like, Oh, I have to go do this. Like, sit down and watch like five YouTube videos. Do you know what I mean? It's like, people come with some homework. No, I mean, we had our launch session yesterday for this new one. We just launched this new the latest cohort. We had over 170 people turn out live for this first session. And I can't tell you like the number of people in the comments. And afterward, we do it on crowd cast, by the way, that are just so fired up. And partly, it's like people need connection right now more than ever, right? They just want to be with other people who are like, doing the same thing they're doing and excited about it. And they're just feeding off that energy. And it's powerful. So it's as much about the experience of it, I think, as it is like, Oh, I'm doing a course.  yeah.

 

David Jackson  

How often do you guys offer that course?

 

Jessica Shambora  

Every five weeks

 

David Jackson  

YOu have a new student coming in here. 

 

Jessica Shambora  

So much fun. It's basically a party in there and people lots I can't tell you how every cohort of the very end I hear from people saying, I'm so sad. It's over. Like I and I mean, I'll just join the next one just so I can be a part of it. It's like I totally get it.

 

David Jackson  

I understand you have a free program. So what can you do on the free plan? Yeah, so we dip their toe in the water we

 

Jessica Shambora  

have a free plan and basically it just offers like,  fairly limited function. But we have a ton of folks using it, you bring your people in, I believe you can do topics in there, and you don't have access to groups or courses. So that's something that you don't have. I don't think you have the member categories. So it's fairly basic in terms of like, you can post things and you can organize them by topics. But beyond that, there isn't a lot you can do.

 

David Jackson  

So what is the next level up from free is the what is their

 

Jessica Shambora  

community plan. And the Community Plan starts at $23 per month, and actually, that's if you purchase annually. And so with your community plan, you'll get your own web domain. So again, we want this to feel like your own little world. So your own web domain, you get unlimited moderators. And then as we mentioned, you can charge for membership. So you get groups, you get,  events. What are some of the other features that people really love about community plan? You get like a we have like a member referral program so you can track who's bringing people in. We have this polling question. You can add an icebreaker question so that anybody who joins to answer that icebreaker question, yeah, you can find numbers who are online now, we also have this great feature called the welcome and featured section. That's basically the ability to pin multiple posts at the top of your activity feed. And so with the welcome section, it's a it's a section where your members see that for the first seven days that they're members, you can show them special posts to help them with their onboarding. And then after that week, they then begin to see your featured section, which is you can feature groups and courses in that section. You can feature articles or events, just the most important things you want to make sure that you get in front of people.

 

David Jackson  

The teacher I just smiled a lot because that's I was a teacher for Yeah, it's good. When I see a good onboarding process. I'm like, Yes, hallelujah. The referral thing could be really cool because you could have like a weird on that weird. You could have some sort of,  you get a T-shirt. Yeah, the person that refers the most people this month,  gets the free t-shirt of the month kind of thing. That's it. could be very unique. And that's you said it was 23 annually. What is it? If it, if it's monthly, is 28? monthly if you buy that? Yeah. The other thing that people are gonna ask is, well, like, How do I know what to charge?

 

Jessica Shambora  

Oh, yeah, that is a question we get.

 

David Jackson  

We've never heard that question. Never

 

Jessica Shambora  

No, no, only every single time we have any sort of, I mean, I run several hours of office hours on every Thursday. And it's basically the most common question that comes up. So we have a rubric that we give people to help them determine what would be the right price. I mean, it starts with knowing your ideal member. It starts with really pinpointing the purpose of your money network and what you're helping people to do and the change that you're helping them make in their lives, and figuring out what that's worth to them. And also figuring out if they didn't use your community as a way to getting to that result, what are their other options out there and what would they pay for those options? So whether it's private coaching or therapy or a class or a book or something else, Figure out what that would cost them. And then,  back it out. That's how we approach it. But, and then beyond that, I can just sit and talk to people about what they're thinking about charging. And then I can because I've seen so many now I can get people a sense of like, yeah, that feels like it's in the right ballpark of what,  people would pay for this type of thing.

 

David Jackson  

Do you see people undercharge along because when I, when I started the School of podcasting, it was five bucks.

I thought if I could get 100 people, I'd be $500 a month. And then my friend said, What can you buy online? That's of decent quality for five bucks. And I went, that's really where you run into it. It's not that you, you can have the best thing ever. You're dealing with a perceived value.

 

Jessica Shambora  

And that's so is there so important and yes, they probably run into because we have a lot of people who are moving from having a free Facebook group over to something with their mighty network. They either want to create a paid membership or they want to create paid groups and courses inside of their mighty network. So they're like, well, if I could just get, like you said, If I could just get like 100 people to pay me like $2. And it's like, it doesn't work that way, you're not going to get people to who were getting something for free. And I'll pay you just a little bit more to get it on another platform. So you basically have to offer a completely differentiated product experience from your mighty network. And then we recommend going premium. So if you're starting from scratch, we tend to say that the best way to do this is go like charge a one time fee for like a six to eight-week course, in the hundreds of dollars, right? So anywhere from like 300 to $600.

And then once you get that initial group of people in, it could be as small as five, as many as 50. through that experience, then you shift them over to paying like a monthly subscription as they continue to implement what it is that you've taught them. That's a model that we see working really, really well. But yeah, we often will tell people don't underprice what you're offering, especially when you compare it to what people would pay for something to again get similar results from another platform. I mean, people pay for therapy, a lot of our I would say a lot of our hosts,  not all of them. But some, for example, our therapists and it's like, you're going to charge typically like 200 bucks a session. So why would you charge someone like $5 for membership and nowhere it just doesn't compute,  and not only that, but like we have this great mighty network. This guy started for adults with ADHD, he coaches them, he used to work with them in private like one to one and he found that and then he started doing groups and then he found that people were getting better results in the groups than in his one to one coaching and he was like, so he gave up the one to one coaching and now he does all this stuff through groups. So there's almost there is an argument to be made that people actually get better results. When they do it when they do something as part of a group than even that they would get from one to one so so we say go higher ticket. And if you are starting out with just a membership, we tend to coach people that be in the probably in the like 2499 All the way up to kind of 4999. And again, if you're running something professional or industry-based where someone could potentially expense it and or they're getting a direct ROI off of being part of that mighty network, you can obviously charge more. If it's more of a hobby, on the other end of things and more of a sort of like something that people are just there for the enjoyment of it, then you're going to kind of usually charge on the lower end. And of course, we always recommend offering,  usually recommend offering an annual option as well.

 

David Jackson  

Well, that's what I was gonna say, it sounds like you have an annual a monthly a one time option. So you could have like a lifetime membership. And then if you add more things, and you're like, wow, the people that got the lifetime are really just like, Wow, what a value. But you could also say, Okay, I know your lifetime, and you have access to everything you've had so far. We added this new thing. And guess what, it's 10 bucks a month or $20 a month or something like that. So can you do a coupon

 

Jessica Shambora  

so the way we do that way we do discounts on our platform as we is kind of unique and it's pretty cool. Actually has something called a hidden plan. And so what you do is you create a special plan at an either discounted rate or, for example, you could offer an extended free trial for up to a year. And then you would give someone a hidden link, we call a share link to that hidden plan, so that only they have access to it. So if you have a group of people you want to offer scholarships to or discounts or,  something like that, you just share that link with just that group of people. And they get access. And for some reason, that link or to get out, which we actually haven't really seen that happen, you can always reset the link. And you can see everybody who's joined on that via that link. So if there's somebody there who isn't supposed to be it's pretty easy to remove them. So it works really well. It's a pretty cool process.

 

David Jackson  

And then we mentioned the free plan, there's the Community Plan, and then the plan after that is the business plan.

 

Jessica Shambora  

 This is where you can do so much in your courses.

We give you access to a member analytics so you can see tons of stuff that are going on that's going on in the background, you get all of your member data. So you get a download of all your members emails, which you really can't do with a Facebook group, right? You don't know who those people are and get all that they get it on their members. So you get that what else is super, we all get what is called premium analytics,

And then we also offer the ability to integrate with Zapier, which opens up access to like 2000 other integrations. And so that's pretty powerful as well. There's a lot of automation that you can do on the back end to just kind of streamline everything. So that's pretty popular as well. So the business plan gets you a lot.

 

David Jackson  

Yeah, it's right now I'm using Thinkific. I could save a fair amount of cash if I moved over. How do I get paid? And do you take any part of the payment? 

 

Jessica Shambora  

Yes, we do. Take a small percentage. So we for our community plan We take So let me start with a free plan, we take 5% of our subscription fees from the free plan. So actually, you can sell access to your mighty network on the free plan currently. And that will take 5% of that. And then on the Community Plan, we take 3%. And then the business plan we take 2%. So that's how that works. And then how you get paid is we do we just do payouts you connect a, there's kind of two ways because we can we offer our stuff for sale on iOS, which is pretty unique. You get paid out by Apple for anything that gets purchased on iOS, and then otherwise you are setting up a stripe account to connect into your mighty network and you'll just get paid through via that stripe account.

 

David Jackson  

And when Apple pays us, are they taking a chunk? Yes,

 

Jessica Shambora  

Apple does take 30% like they do everything. So that and so we actually at mighty networks don't take a percentage of anything that people buy off of Apple, because we want you to make sure that you're getting as much as possible. And the other thing that we do is we allow you to raise your prices on Apple so that if you want to charge more on that platform to recoup any of that loss, you can do that. And you can let your members know that you are doing that, that if they purchase your Apple that it's going to be more expensive.

 

David Jackson  

Have I missed anything? I have my wallet is on fire. I'm already brainstorming things here. 

 

Jessica Shambora  

I would just emphasize like, it's so much fun. It is really, really fun to build a mighty network to be a part of our community of mighty networks hosts. It's one of the reasons I love working there because of the folks that we get to work with the creativity that we see they're so inspiring and what they're building and how they're bringing people together, especially during a time like this. And  I would just say if you've thought about building something like this, and you've been intimidated or felt like it's gonna be a lot of work, don't let that stop you. It actually doesn't have to be the things that people typically associate with why running or group or community is a lot of work. Things like,  oh, there's gonna be spammers or bots, or I'm gonna have to deal with people and people are messy or it or kind of can be annoying. And the reality is when you build a mighty network, you're bringing your people together. They're the people that you, they're your closest followers fans, the people that love you, they want to be there for the right reasons, they have the right intentions. And so what you end up getting is more energy from the experience. And that ability to have that tight, close connection with your people. That helps you figure out what's the next thing I'm going to build are going to launch for these people. So I would just kind of want people to check their assumptions at the door about what it means to build a community and actually see it as something that can give them energy as opposed to sucking energy away. It's just a really delightful joyful experience. And I've seen it over and over and I just think it's the world needs more people doing this kind of work right now. So if you're at all inclined, come do a free trial, check out the masterclass. It's so Watch fun and see what it's all about and see if it's something that you could benefit from but I do think it's really really fun. I mean, I can't tell you the number of times I've been like "I'm gonna go build a mighty network to do  so you got to stay focused." here I got my money

 

David Jackson  

Well Jessica, thank you so much for your time are deeply appreciate it.

 

Jessica Shambora  

Absolutely. Thanks so much for having me. It was super fun to talk about all this